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Red Nose Day: The Selfie Gets Serious

Comic Relief started back in 1985 with Red Nose Day as it’s main event to help the famine in Ethiopia. Since then, it has helped raise millions of pounds and helped countless good causes in this country and across the globe.

The same values remain at Red Nose Day’s core. But that does not mean it isn’t moving with the digital age. In fact, it’s embracing it more than ever to make sure that it can continue to make raising money as easy as possible and to maximise its engagement.

Sharing funny faces

 

At the centre of this year’s Red Nose Day is Make Your Face Funny For Money. Look around your office today and you might see some funny looking faces (or is that just normal?!).

The Red Nose has been around since Comic Relief was born. But this year’s campaign has a very 21st century flavour, and by this we mean, the selfie.

Whatever your opinion on the selfie, you can’t argue with the fact that they are a massive trend that has become ingrained in society. The Beeb have been smart to jump on it, and as making your face funny is naturally something people will share on social media, it’s the ideal way to raise awareness of the charity and to encourage others to donate too!

That’s why you’re bound to have seen a swathe of funny faces flooding your Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and other social media feeds already today.

Making fundraising easier

As well as using a digital approach to come up with creative ideas that’ll get people talking about Red Nose Day, the charity has also tapped into digital to make it easy for people to share their fundraising aims through giving pages.

JustGiving is responsible for revolutionising individuals’ fundraising campaigns by making donations a breeze. The platform harnesses the potential to share small campaigns through social media.

The most powerful and poignant example of this came last year. Teenage cancer victim Stephen Sutton’s message went viral thanks to his dedication in raising awareness of teenage cancer through the internet.

Stephen set up a website and blog, and his positive message and tireless fundraising soon captured the imagination of the world. He raised almost £5m for the Teenage Cancer Trust, smashing his original £10,000 target.

It was something that could only happen in the 21st century, ensuring that Stephen would leave a long-lasting legacy after his tragic death at just 19-years-old. As tragic as it is, it is also evidence of the way digital and social media have transformed the charity sector.

Red Nose Day have made sure they’re no exception – so tonight, get that red nose on, take that selfie and remember to donate!

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